BARE HANDS

An agricultural and social development organization producing greenhouse networks that propagate nutritious crop alternatives for smallholder farms.

Our mission is to provide nutritious plants with high performing results for the future of farmers and consumers. Bare Hands believes in a hand up, not a handout. We want to encourage small farmers to keep a competitive edge in the market by providing healthy cash crops and education on sustainable practices.

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PLANTS

GROWING NUTRITIOUS PLANTS

With bases in LA and ANT, (lower Alabama, USA & Antigua, Guatemala), Bare Hands specializes in plant propagation to aid farmers in the most delicate time of a plant’s life. Seed to sprout.

We see the universal need for farmers to have more accessible and nutritious plant alternatives to mega crops.

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PEOPLE

TO MAKE HEALTHY PEOPLE

By providing crops that fit into local agro-ecosystems – we are creating a pathway for farmers to increase overall productivity, support food sovereignty, and preserve the land for the next generation.

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PROFITS

WITH SUSTAINABLE PROFITS

Bare Hands has the future in mind. We educate smallholder farmers to manage their fields and landscapes taking a whole systems approach.

We are focused on solutions for the challenges that global agriculture faces in the 21st century: meeting the needs of the growing population while adapting to climate change.  


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HOW WE GOT HERE
We began in 2013, planting fruit and pine trees for the people of Chijtinimit, a small village in the mountains of Guatemala. In this time, we saw a need for alternative crops, as corn and beans are low in nutrition and economically inflated. Thus, intensive farming for deflated health and profits. We want to change that.

WHERE WE’RE GOING
Bare Hands is developing greenhouse networks. Our first project,  in Antigua, Guatemala, will be filled with nutritious cash crops. This means lower risk, higher yielding, and quality plants for farmers.